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Sex, Love, And Psych
Sex, Love, And Psych

Episode · 1 year ago

Episode 22: LGBTQIA+ History in Canada

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

A brief examination of some big points in history that helped us get to the point where we are now at. This episode largely focuses on gay men and drag, but acknowledges it is only a small look at some of the expansive history of these communities.

Hello and welcome back to this week's episode of Sex, love and psych I know I'm a couple days late, but I had so much going on last week. Got A small car accident. Everyone is fine, but insurance and stress and all that, it was a lot and I could not do the amount of research I wanted to do for this episode and do it in a way that I would be proud of by Monday. So I just decided to push it a couple days. So thank you so much for a holding on and waiting. I did really want to do another pride episode for pride month. Also, sorry in advance if you hear a little like rustling or chaos in the background. Nora's being a little crazy Um. But jumping into it, I wanted to do this week's episode on some of the Lgbtqia plus history here in Alberta, just to kind of give us a look at the past how we've gotten to the point where we are at now, expanding from Alberta into Canada. A little bit to get into like laws and legislations as well. Most of the Info I will be referencing for this episode came from two of the classes I took this mister and last semester a lot of the dates and stuff are from a guest speaker I had do a zoom meeting for one of my classes last semester. His name was Darren Hagen, DA R R I N H Agen. I would highly, highly recommend looking him up on Youtube. He has a bunch of really great videos a lot of the history of pride. He's he was a drug performer. He has a lot of just amazing stories of pride in the Lgbtqi a communities over the past like forty years. I want to say so a really, really valuable resource. You...

...should definitely look him up on Youtube. Check them out. And some of the other dates and information for loss and legislations came from my sociology to seventy one introduction to the family class that I just finished this past week. And then I did reference Wikipedia, which, thank goodness this is not an academic thing because I know I'm not supposed to reference book of Wikipedia, but I did just for an individual story that I thought was very important that I didn't have enough information on in my notes. But to hop right into it. I want to go way, way in the past of the Queer History predecriminalization and some notes and dates that I got from there. So I want to go all the way back to like one thousand eight hundred and ninety two, because gross indecency became a crime. This largely applied to men. Nobody really wanted to explain lesbianism to Queen Victoria, so the focus of this gross indecency charge was focused on gay men. In one thousand, nineteen O one. Will make a little jump. Early Cross dressing in Edmonton included Hazel Rutherford, who did a lot of costume balls for high society. So we've got that cross dressing and drag as early. He's like nineteen o one in history. There's a lot of interesting stuff there. But making a little jump to nineteen thirty cream lab you can express male gender expression, so cross dressing from female to male and in one nineteen thirty five. So five years later, was charged with vagrancy and was forced to present as a woman and just be a woman. The nine s were also when the term homosexual first started being used.

In nineteen thirty seven Ted North was born. He would go on to become a drag queen who was eventually friends with Pierre Trudeau and was very instrumental in decriminalization. Thirty two years in the future. I did want to hop to nineteen forty two. They kind of started rounding up gay men. A lot of these men came from the theater community, as that was a safe space for gay men. A lot of these people are being round up. The media kind of ran with the scandal of rounding up and reported the individuals as being boys, as victims of homosexualities or homosexuality, but they were nineteen. Only twelve people were charged, but rumors expanded and included a lot more than twelve people and it became really tense with that kind of social media acceleration process. Like that media scare, there was some amendments made that further criminalized homosexuality in nineteen forty eight and another round up was made in nineteen forty nine. So to jump to nineteen fifty seven, if we pop back to Ted North, the one who was born nineteen thirty seven, he traveled to San Francisco and in nineteen fifty seven and kind of really got to know the drag community and he was one of the people that brought it back to Canada and started the que awards, and you learning how to use drag as a political political tool. And one interesting thing about Ted North is he never had a...

...drag name. Now to go a few more years, George Everett Clipper is going to be a really important person in the history of Lgbtqi a communities in Alberta in Canada in general. He was born in Calgary and George Everett Clipper was the last person in Canada to be arrested, charged, prosecuted, convicted and imprisoned for gross indecency. He was initially charged in nineteen sixty with eighteen charges. He was released and then he wound up moving up to the Northwest Territories and in nineteen sixty five he was investigated for arson and took talk to some police. He was found innocent of the arson. He wasn't who they were looking for. But in this process he did admit to homosexual relations with four different men and was then sentenced as a sex offender and put back in prison. and He tried to appeal in nineteen sixty seven, but his appeal was dismissed and he wouldn't be released until nineteen seventy one. So now popping back into some of of what else was going on in that time period. In nineteen sixty one, so that, like year after his first arrest, laws were again further tough and to Prit to sentenced people to prison for life and label them as dangerous offenders and sex offenders. In nineteen sixty five, just a little note, the subtle theater opened here in Edmonton. It is now the starlight room. I'm just going to double checks if I got anything...

...else here. Okay, yeah, and then in nineteen sixty nine is when Pierre Trudeau actually was in power, when homosexuality was decriminalized. This happened the day before the infamous stonewall riot down in the states and it brought in a new level of openness. You are not to be put in jail just for being gay. This was kind of springboarding off of when George Everett Clippers appeal was dismissed in nineteen sixty seven. There was a lot of controversy surrounding that and how he was still being imprisoned and told he would be imprisoned for life. There was a lot of controversy around this time and then, to you short years later, Pierre Trudeau decriminalized homosexuality and then George Everett Clipper was released in nineteen seventy one. He lived another like twenty five years. died of kidney disease. I believe, not a hundred percent on that, though. Don't quote me on that specific fact, but yeah, and then to get into some of the other legislation stuff that I wanted to add. So we're going to jump back into this timeline. Sorry. One thousand nine hundred and sixty nine. What's decriminalized? In one thousand nine hundred and ninety six, so a little bit more recent history, sexual orientation was added to the Canadian Human Rights Act, so you can't discriminate against someone based on their sexual orientation. In two thousand, modernization of benefits and Obligations Act passed and which acknowledged...

...benefits after your partner passed. So this refers to how in a marriage. In a marriage, when your husband or wife passes, then you have rights to certain benefits and that kind of stuff, maybe their pension or whatever, after they've passed. When, before same sex was legalized, homosexual couples could not access the same benefits. So it was modernized a little bit into thousand even before it was legalized, where it could acknowledge some of the benefits if you were like partner's first to an amount of time. In two thousand and one, Reverend Brett Hawks married to same sex couples. Enough Toronto Church and the city refused to recognize these as marriages and they're actually like the city was sued two thousand and two. So the year later, Ontario Peels court ruled that these marriages were legal. Two Thousand and three, Ontario ruled that the heterosexual definition of marriage in the law was invalid. And then this followed up by Michael Leshner and Michael Stark being the first homosexual couple to legally marry in Ontario. They were named Times newsmakers of the year, or sorry, Canadian newsmakers of the year in that year and they are still married today. So moving on from they, then Mike Glenn Michael being the first legal homosexual marriage in Canada. In two thousand and four, the Supreme Court of Canada judges...

...the definition of marriage is a federal decision, and in two thousand and five the same sex marriage was legalized through the passing of Bill Sea Thirty Eight, changing that legal definition to a lawful union of two persons to exclusion of all others. One little fun fact here is that the Conservatives were largely against this legalization but, possibly as a surprise, the liberals had a very, very mixed vote on this. Like it was a close vote. It almost didn't get past kind of like mixed level. Some other countries, just to note that kind of beat Canada to legalization. The Netherlands made same sex marriage legal in two thousand and one, Belgium in two thousand and three, and then Spain. In Canada, came up in two thousand and five and even more recently, if we think that a couple years ago. I'm not sure how in tune to Edmonton Pride events everyone was in two thousand and nineteen. But the two thousand and Nineteen Edmonton Pride was canceled after the after a lot of controversy and political and social issues within the community and after the two thousand and eighteen parade was halted by the majority of racial minority members of lgbtqia plus communities in Edmonton and they had come up with a list of demands to better serve the more marginalized members of the community. And Edmonton Pride, who's primarily run by volunteers here and as a nonprofit organization, didn't feel like they could necessarily...

...meet all of these demands or negotiate on them. There was a lot of controversy and displeasure on both sides. I'm not obviously two thousand and twenty with covid and everything was a different story. I have seen that in two thousand and twenty one here there is kind of a virtual kind of pride event, or you can go around Edmonton and scank you our codes and read some history on different events that have happened in different areas. I just saw that pop up on my facebook. I'm sure if you did a quick Google of two thousand and twenty one Edmonton Pride, you could kind of find more info on those. Maybe I'll go check it out in the next week since I don't have school. If I do, I will let you know next week. A little note with Edmntion pride. It originally started in one thousand nine hundred and eighty and up until two thousand and eighteen it had become one of the five largest pride events in the world. I wish I could say that, with all the progress that's been made over the last even couple decades since same sex marriage was legalized, that all the issues have been worked out and Lgbtqi people are completely and utterly accepted by society. But unfortunately that's not the case. Hate crimes in Canada in two thousand and ten. Sixteen percent of those who are based on sexual orientation. Really unfortunate. The other categories of that would be fifty percent. Based on race religion was twenty eight percent. There is still a lot of discrimination and judgment and hate cast on the Lgbtqi plus...

...communities throughout Canada and the world, unfortunately. I hope that maybe with some education on the past, we can all have a little more empathy and understanding and a better quest to learn more about these communities before we and these people, before we cast judgment on them. One of the big takeaways I took from the same sex marriage in Canada unit, from this introduction to the family class that I just took was this concept that people in these communities that are fighting for marriage, the right to adopt, the right to not be discriminated against in the workplace throughout history. We like to paint them as these big heroes, and they definitely are, but we need to also remember that they're just regular people who want to do regular people things. They're just people who want to be able to have get married and have kids and have a regular job and just not face discrimination on a daily basis and to just be who they are, just like they're sis and Hetero counterparts who don't necessarily have to think about these things on an everyday basis, which is kind of where that concept of privilege come from. Hetero and SIS people can be poored, they can be beaten, they can be abused, but generally it's not because they are Hetero and sis. So just keep that in the back of your mind when you're trying to understand these kind of concepts and these arguments, and maybe some of the anger that comes from these communityies is that they are just fighting to be treated the same and be able to live as regular human beings without...

...having to worry about it. So I think that is all I wanted to get through for this week's episode. Oh, I did want to make a little shout out to a committee that I just joined at mckewen. If you are a Mickewen class mate, person a mckewen student, is what I was going for there. We have created and just started a committee called S Vo of Svo V, student voice on violence elimination. We are a student Rant, student made committee that is working to kind of raise awareness about sexual violence on campus, create new education, work with other committees. If you are on a different committee that you think we could collaborate on. That's something we are looking to do in the future. I am kind of sad because I am finishing my degree in December and I'm just I would love to see and be involved with this committee pass then. So if it is something you're involved in interested in for future, I'm sure they will be taking more members in the fall and beyond. It's going to be Super Fun and exciting. I'm very interested. We had a committee meeting yesterday. We all seem to be on the same page of what we want to see done. But we will be creating some social media accounts and possibly an email address to just better reach the students of Mickew in. If you have ideas, shoot them my way. If you have something on Mqwen like related, that is like sexual balance...

...related, just shoot me a message to on that. I'm sure we can talk it out. I look forward to hearing from you again everyone. Thank you so much for tuning in this week. I hope you maybe learn something new about the history of lgbtqia people. I know of that this episode largely focused on gay men, with some mentions of lesbians, and that there are so many other aspects of these communities, like trends, people in non baronary people and all of that. This was just the information I had handy. There's obviously a lot more to it, but I figured this would be a little good introduction to our history here in Canada. Thank you so much for tuning in and I will be back on Monday. Have a great rest of your week, everybody. Happy Pride month.

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